Bee Venom Therapy in action – does it really cure the pain?

Following on from my previous post, titled Bee Venom Therapy (BVT) …. is it a sting too far?, I now want to write a little about the experiences that my wife and I had last year using bee venom to treat her rheumatoid arthritis (RA), if you have just stumbled across this post then I would strongly recommend that you read my previous article to gain some background and understanding of what BVT is and why we are doing this!

Having read Charles Mraz’s book we felt quite confident with the actual direct application of  venom at the target sites. We informally discussed the process that we were about to undertake with our GP so that he was aware, and although western medicine doesn’t really prescribe this sort of treatment I think he was both intrigued and entertained at the same time, however he was not dismissive having heard anecdotal stories of similar treatments in the past and has maintained an interest in the results since.

Before the main treatments began we borrowed an epipen (just in case of an emergency!), we then carried out a single ‘test sting’ on the hand to make sure that my wife didn’t have an allergy to bee venom, even though she had previously been stung we needed to make sure that an allergy hadn’t subsequently developed in the intervening years. This also gave a taster or reminder of the pain that would be experienced in the coming weeks and an opportunity for her to change her mind. This whole treatment had to be very patient led, so I did not push the sessions and let my wife decide where she felt she wanted the stings to be applied. Luckily as a chiropractor who also does dry needling she has a very good understanding of the bodies mechanisms and where the trigger points or target areas should be.

Bees in a jar

Bees waiting their 'turn to help'

The bees are collected into a jar during the normal hive checks and this also set the frequency that the BVT sessions took place, purely through convenience as my bees are located in an ‘out apiary’ (so not kept at home) and we didn’t want to disturb the colonies more than we already do (also bees don’t ‘store’ that well once bottled). The collection jar is just an empty  jar with air holes drilled in the lid and some foliage for supporting the bees as they struggle to grip on the glass sides. If they were being left overnight a little honey was also added although this is best avoided as even the bees get sticky.

When the bees are to be ‘used’ they are plucked from the jar using ‘reverse’ tweezers, sometimes called jewellery makers tweezers, that close shut when the finger pressure is released rather than open as in normal tweezers, this allowed me to clamp the bees ready for application of the sting.

Bee in 'reverse tweezers'

Bee held in 'reverse tweezers'

I can’t say that my wife really relished the thought of being stung numerous times, and although she had seen the minor effect it had on me during my previous seasons as a beekeeper she had also seen the slightly more entertaining and dramatic effect of the histamine production when I was stung on my top lip. With the ‘test sting’ being a resounding success we decided to push on with the BVT.

The bees were collected and stings applied on average every 10 days or so, we applied between 10 – 12 stings at each session. Normally this would involve 2 in each foot or on the ankles, 2 on each of the knees and two on each hand, anywhere on the knuckles but we varied this routine depending if one area was  particularly painful with the arthritis  prior to that session. The stings were left in place for anywhere between 2 and 10 minutes so that  full venom dose was received. When the stingers are removed it is important not to use an alcohol wipe on the sting site as this neutralises the effect of the venom. Unfortunately the bee dies after they have used their sting and they also release a pheromone so the dying bees were removed from the immediate area as the BVT sessions took place outdoors and we didn’t want attract any extra non-participants into the area.  A few bees flying around your head when you are not behind a veil can be very off-putting!

Stings applied to joints on both hands

Stings applied to the knuckle joints on both hands

By the end of the 2011 season my wife had been stung 129 times, so you must now be thinking that she is either a very brave or possibly a slightly mad women, but if you had been diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis at the age of 35, if it was in your body and your joints, and you were told that the only answer that modern medicine had to offer was to spend the rest of your life taking a cocktail of anti-inflammatory and other drugs (with pretty unappealing side effects in their own right) then maybe you to would be willing to take the chance that an alternative cure could be found.

Well of course I know that that my wife is an intelligent, level-headed women and as I have previously stated we didn’t start this whole process without a lot of thought, research and planning, I guess it was just a case of weighing up the options available to us and the western medicine route felt a bit like giving up hope.

Sting swelling

Localised swelling shortly after applying the sting

The stings did exactly what it said on the (yellow and black) packet. They caused localised pain for a short period, followed by a slight redness and swelling at the sting site. Then as histamine is produced by the body the swelling spreads across a larger area of the body, often causing  large red swollen areas that last for several days.As the season progressed Emma definitely developed a tolerance to the venom, in the same way that beekeepers often do, and the effects of the venom became less visibly evident.  I think that the most discomfort was caused, not by the initial pain of the sting as one may have thought, but rather by the itching over the next few hours and sometimes days, particularly during the hotter days of the summer.

So was the BVT effective? 

When my wife was first diagnosed with the RA in 2010 she attended an appointment with an NHS rheumatologist. She had blood samples and x-rays taken to assess her current condition and the extent of any existing joint damage.

The early signs are that the RA is in remission but more importantly than that, having just had the autumn and winter period so dreaded by many RA sufferers as their symptoms worsen during this period my wife has not complained of, nor suffered from painfully swollen joints as she  had done during the previous year. So it looks like the BVT has gone some way into reducing both the swelling and pain, the thing we need to find out now is if it prevents damage to the joints or even reverses the process.

The subsequent visits to the rheumatologist has involved further x-rays and tests and although they feel that, against the odds, that Emma is definitely showing signs of remission they do not have much interest in the BVT or accept that it is a potential contributing factor. We will have to now wait until further tests are carried out in future months to see how the BVT is really working, but all the early signs are positive.

I should point out that during the period that the stings were applied my wife was also undergoing other treatments such as acupuncture and a cleansing diet (to me this was harsher than the stings!) so any remission may be attributable to a combination of these treatments. When we reached the end of the beekeeping season in 2011 my wife became concerned that with the bees being ‘away’ and no longer being stung that the symptoms would become worse again and she became quite worried about not being stung, a complete reverse of a few months earlier!

Over the last few weeks my wife has also started to take ‘honeygar’, a combination of honey, cider vinegar and a little water, as a medicine. This come highly recommended in Margaret Hills book ‘Curing arthritis the drug free way’ as well as having more modern day champions such as Ranulph Fiennes, who swears by it for his own arthritis control.

So what is the plan for the future?

As the new beekeeping season is about to begin in 2012, and the girls are out flying again, we will also be starting the next set of BVT sessions. This is my wife’s choice so it shows that she must feel that there was a strong enough benefit from last years BVT to subject herself to the pain and swelling again and hopefully we will continue to see the RA in remission. In the testimonials that I have read people are sometimes ‘cured’ after just a few treatments and others have a longer journey. I guess it is part dependant on the level of RA being treated in the  patient as well as other factors such as the level that their auto-immune system is functioning at.

I hope that you have enjoyed reading this article, if you have any experience of BVT, either personally or anecdotal, or would like to make a comment I would love to hear from you. It is still early days for us but sharing this experience is important and maybe it can also be of help to others.

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46 responses to this post.

  1. I wish your wife the best! I’ve been giving myself a few stings, but as bee sting allergy “shots” rather than for the BVT effect. Hence, I usually sting my self roughly once a week during the season and about half that often when it’s harder to find flying bees. So although I’m not doing BVT per-say, I have been stinging myself near a patch of psoriasis on my ankle. I’ve had relatively mild psoriasis for about the last 25 years. This is also an autoimmune disorder, and as with RA, traditional drugs are problematic for the chronic condition. In the past I would use cortisone creams “as required” to keep my patch of psoriasis somewhat under control but avoid the “skin thinning” that comes with overuse of the drugs.
    When I started to give myself stings for my allergy prevention, I figured I might as well add inflammation to an already inflamed area, so I would sting the psoriasis area. This has not cured me, but I have not used cortisone creams for many months at this point. I think there is a mild beneficial effect at the one sting/week rate I’ve been giving myself.
    I’ve always maintained that “doing something different” is better than doing the same thing when you have a chronic problem. Changing diet or exercise routines force the body to do something different – and so do a bunch of bee stings. I also believe in a good placebo! There is so much going for it, I can’t see how BVT can fail to work! I sure hope it cures your wife!

    Gary

    Reply

  2. I have an exboyfriend who is obsessed with beekeeping. in fact, he travels all over and gives lectures about organic beekeeping. Anyways, about a year ago, i was experiencing intense nerve pain in my shoulder,and arthritis in my spine. We did several bee venom therapy sessions together. About 5 to 10 bee stings around my shoulder area each session.. we took turns. He would apply the bees on me, and I applied them on him.How romantic. Ha! I felt bad about the bees dying, but I really did find major relief from the pain. Bee venom therapy really does work! I am glad your wife is finding relief. Bees are amazing. Thanks for your post! 🙂

    Reply

    • Again thanks for your comment – it is really good to have testimonies from other people that have used the BVT and had good results and further highlights the fact that it does actually work and there really should be more research carried out in this area.

      Reply

  3. Posted by kevin on June 29, 2012 at 2:11 am

    Hello.im very intrested in this treatment.my girlfriend has the same..and i hate all the pills.we live in red deer alberta canada.please help us with any treatment centers we can get to in the area… any info would be great..thank you and good luck…

    Reply

    • Hi Kevin, thanks for your comment. I am based in the UK so don’t have details of any local clinics but you could Google for local apitherapy or beekeepers associations and see if anyone a little bit nearer can give you some assistance. Good Luck!

      Dan

      Reply

  4. Posted by Nekai on July 3, 2012 at 11:45 pm

    If she can tolerate it, you might want to do stings 3 times a week for greater effect now that she has a tolerance. Unfortunately, while the irritating after-effects ease once you’re accustomed to the venom, the stings never hurt any less!

    *—–BTW – for the benefit of other people who might want to try BVT but aren’t beekeepers – anyone administering stings or present when they are given needs to have a test sting to rule out allergic reaction. And having an epipen on hand isn’t just a good idea, it’s essential, along with an oral antihistamine.—–*

    I was stinging myself one day when I noticed the back of my throat itching. Then my inner ears itched too, then my scalp. My heart started racing, my blood seemed to drain from my face and my gut cramped. “Oh…allergic reaction,” I said to myself in slow motion as if I were talking to myself from a mile away. And then I took a pill. This was after having hundreds of uneventful stings. Later I heard this can happen to beekeepers after years of getting stung too.

    I didn’t mention in my comment on the other entry but I did 18 stings three times a week for the first 5 years. My friend (Dr. of Traditional Chinese Medicine) said more isn’t better – 20 or fewer suffice.
    After that I backed off and sometimes went months without stings. Now I do 8-12 three times a week when symptoms crop up and it always helps. BVT helps my energy level too, and helps me sleep well.
    A change in diet (no white sugar, white flour, reduced dairy and meat), and adding extra B complex and vitamin C when stinging are also good choices.
    Hope your wife’s condition improves more and more!

    Reply

    • Hi Nekai,

      Many thanks for this addition to the blog, it is very reassuring to hear that you have had a positive experience (despite the initial stings) and very good advice re: allergic reactions. I don’t think you can ever get complacent with bee venom or when working around bees, even if you have previously experienced many many stings! I also agree that combining BVT with dietary changes would be the best way forward. Good luck for the future!

      Dan

      Reply

  5. Posted by Blanca Nuno-Field on October 13, 2012 at 6:01 am

    Hello,
    I’ve been doing BVT for 2 weeks. Im going to Tecate Mexico to a guy I was recommended. The gal that recommended the Apitherapist is in remission from RA. now fro 2 years and 1 month.. I stopped taking the methotrexate the week I started the BVT. The first week I had 5 stings. This last week I did 6 stings. I’m going to go every Monday. I am faithfull that i’m going to get the results I need to not have to take these wetern drugs that are terrible for us. .I did mention it to the RA doc and of course he didnt advise it. i’m going to keep doing BVT. I will let you know how me and my friend and her 76 yr old dad are all doing> I’m so glad I found your info. Its reasuring.
    May God bless you and your wife.

    Blanca

    Reply

  6. Posted by Kay on May 22, 2013 at 9:46 am

    Hi Does having the bee stings change your RA factor ,I do have a 807 RA factor ..not a lot of pain mainly stiffness …I am 64 years old ….chhers Kay

    Reply

    • Hi Kay,

      my wife was tested again last year and her RA factor had reduced from the previous tests which indicated that she was in remission although the rheumatologists still do not really accept that this can be related to the BVT. However my wife has been feeling ill again recently, although unrelated to the symptoms of RA, the gp’s were unable to diagnose anything so they took blood tests to see if these could shed any light on the cause. When the results came in (literally two weeks ago) they did not indicate any illness however the RA factors are no longer there and the blood counts are perfectly normal again which woudl indicate that the RA is totally gone. I am hoping that my wife will write up a short testimonial that I can put up here on the blog.

      Of course I can’t prove that it was the two years of BVT and the 260 odd stings that she received over that period that led to this recovery. There were almost certainly other contributory factors such as the use of honegar, dietary changes, increased exercise and acupuncture but she did not use the prescribed medication nor anti-inflammatories as recommended. I hope that this is of some help to you and that you are able to find a route to recovery as well.
      Kind regards

      Daniel

      Reply

  7. Posted by betty kohoot on June 5, 2013 at 5:16 pm

    do you know a clinic or a place where they do the bee venom therapy around Abbotsford, British Columbia

    Reply

    • Hi Betty, I am in the UK so am not aware of any clinics local to you however it may be worth contacting your local beekeepers association or searching the internet for local apitherapy or BVT groups to see if you can find some help. You may be able to source a supply of bees if you are brave enough to carry out the stinging yourself but I recommend that you at least read Charles Mraz’s book – Health and the honeybee – and consult with your gp before starting a course of treatment.

      Good luck, best wishes

      Reply

  8. I do a lot of walking at work and have been suffering from OA for several years now (both knees). It worsened during foot pain, foot surgery, and the subsequent recovery. When mowing my yard I ran over a groundbee nest (which agitated the honeybee hives nearby). Needless to say, I was “swarmed”. I can only guess the number of stings but it was, conservatively, a couple dozen—all to my head/scalp area (with the exception of 2 to my face). I removed numerous stingers while continuing mowing, then removed at least 10 more while checking my poor scalp in the mirror, then I scraped off several more while recovering in bed. Two days later, at work, I noticed I had very little pain compared to what I had become used to. Not very scientific, but definitely worth looking further into…

    Reply

    • I have been asked many times if the BVT would be effective for treatment of OA and to be honest I have no idea, I’m glad it has reduced your pain and would be interested to know if the symptoms are permanently reduced or if you find that they return and if so how long the pain relief was for.
      Regards

      Dan

      Reply

  9. Posted by keepingthefaith on August 28, 2013 at 9:35 pm

    I was diagnosed with anti-inflammatory RA last year and was put on all kinds of toxic medications (methotrexate, Simponi injections, sulfasalazine, zipsor). In any event, I just felt worse. I, too, stumbled upon a yellow jacket nest and was stung 5 times. As much as the stinger sites hurt, the rest of my body was absolutely pain free for about 8 hours. I had seen something on TV a while back about BVT and so I researched it a little more on the internet. Like everyone else, my doctors scoffed at the idea that I should try this. The only thing was, I did not want to be injected by bees (remembering the pain of the stinger sites). I found a website in New Zealand called apihealth.com that has been able to create a “chewable” been venom tablet (you cannot swallow bee venom or your stomach acids will destroy the anti-inflammatory effects of the venom). Here is what their site (www.apihealth.com) says for the product called ApiVENZ Relief:

    “ApiVENZ Relief is natural and innovative product of New Zealand. In that product unique properties of New Zealand Bee Venom “VENZ™” combined with nutritional properties of Glucosamine. Glucosamine and bee venom maintain joint mobility function and allow keeping joint mobility in normal. The product designed for joint mobility support.

    The key unique ingredient of ApiVENZ Relief chewable tablets is natural dried New Zealand bee venom VENZ™, collected by ApiHealth NZ Ltd patented technology, which is not harmful to the bees (NZ Patent # 329585).”

    The only problem was that one bottle of 60 tablets costs about $30 (with shipping) and when you figure I started out by taking 6-8 pills per day, I was only looking at a week’s supply, and my pharmacy insurance won’t cover bee venom pills. I was able to figure it all out, however, by ordering a minimum shipment of 96 bottles which, with shipping and customs costs, came out to about $14 per bottle. Worth every penny. I am now down to 4 pills a day (each pill is worth one bee sting and I take two in the morning and two before bedtime); and I no longer take any other medication, except my blood pressure medication.

    Although, I must admit I also started taking Velvet Elk Antler Extract around the same time I tried to bee venom pills. Velvet Elk (or Deer) Antler Extract is advertised as a human growth hormone (HGH) and can aid in the reversal of achy joints/muscles. It also advertises an energy boost (but I don’t get much of a boost out of it). I don’t know if it’s all a hoax or what, but I do know that “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it,” and since I have been taking the bee venom pills and the HGH (in spray form — 4 sprays under the tongue twice a day — see http://www.elkusa.com), I have basically no more pain in my joints.

    Hope this is helpful to anyone who suffers from RA and/or MS pain.

    Keepingthefaith

    Reply

    • Thank you for sharing this information here, I am sure that it will be of great help to many of the people who have found this blog article through searching for a way to control and reduce their RA symptoms.
      Best regards

      Reply

  10. Posted by Vera Schnapp on September 26, 2013 at 9:47 pm

    I would like to go to the bee tretment .Is there any place that I can go??
    Please my hands is in terrible pain
    Thanks
    Vera Schnapp

    Reply

    • Hi Vera, I’m sorry to hear that you are in a lot of pain. I have no idea where you are in the world so can’t suggest anywhere for you to go but I would advise that you get in contact with your local beekeepers and see if they can give you any help or search on the internet for local apitherapy or BVT clinics. There are other dietary changes that you can make and many people also swear that their symptoms are reduced by taking a mixture of honey and cider vinegar.
      Best regards

      Reply

  11. […] Bee Venom Therapy in action – does it really cure the pain? […]

    Reply

  12. Posted by Alejandra Garcia on June 4, 2014 at 5:55 am

    Hi, my name is Alexandra, I have been very sick for 6-7 yrs. First I was diagnosed with fibromyalgia, and severe cervical, lumbar spine stenosis, with spindolitis, and my sed rate was very elevated, but I was clueless at the time so I didn’t question it. I assumed it was because of my fibromyalgia. Then I whent down hill. Then I started to have 3 days out 7 that I could some what function. I WAS 28-29 yrs old. When all this started to hit me really hard. To the point that I couldn’t write, and I felt so sored like if I had an intense work out the day before. Only without even exercise.
    I started to loose my energy, and pain was taking over my life. I have 3 children, who I was always available to be of help at their schools, but suddenly everything changed, and I became useless, I could not even take a walk any more. So test were done. So they did the rumathoid arthritis factor and it came back very positive, so it read strong positive at <250 and a strong positive was a 55. Well yeah mine broke the high mark alright! And sed rate of 80.
    And now I'm even lucky if I get to go out with my family. Im 35 yrs old. I was put on methotrexate and it made me feel terrible and it ruin my beautiful long hair. I fell into a severe depression to see my hair fall in bunches at a time. Plus I felt more dead than alive. So I stopped the meds on my own. My rheumatologist does not agree but he's not the one feeling what im feeling. And I am looking for something that won't poison me like those kinds of meds.he also suggested humira but I am not ready to start with those kinds of meds. They scare me to death. I would really like to see my Children grow up.
    And be healthy. Im not asking for me to get fully functional but for at least more days to function even if its minimal. To be there for my Children. As of now if I try to cook or try to clean even a little, I will have to pay for it the next day or for more than that.
    I am desperate, I am pleading for help.
    I don't know how to find bees. I cant afford to go to Drs who are doing these therapies.
    can you please give me any advise.
    Please email me. My hands get so swollen I cant even touch anything. I cry of desperation.but I try for my Children not to see me like this. But there's days that I cant even pretend to be ok. Because its so bad.I cant get out of bed.
    please help me.

    Reply

    • Posted by Telle on June 6, 2014 at 1:38 pm

      Alejandra,
      Look for a local beekeepers! Our local beekeeper wouldn’t let us even pay for the bees he gave us and offered us free access to his personal hive. All the beekeepers I’ve talked to are wonderfully caring individuals. If there isn’t someone locally try finding another beekeeper online and calling. I found a man who offered to mail us small batches of bees this winter when the local hives are unsafe to open up.
      My husband has had ankylosing spondylitis for 4 years and is in so much pain some days he can hardly walk. We just started BVT, but it seemed to help significantly. However, this last round of bee stings triggered a pretty severe allergic reaction (hands too swollen to close, swelling past elbows, full body itch, and vomiting). We’re considering trying again as we’ve heard that alcohol consumption combined with stings produces more severe reactions and he’d had a couple drinks with the guys after work.
      Good luck!

      Reply

  13. Posted by Montse on June 10, 2014 at 12:47 am

    Hi Daniel,
    Thanks for your post. You are a wonderful husband!
    I just want to ask you if you know any specialist (or someone who knows how to apply the venom) in London. It seems here nobody knows about BVT… I am a fan of bee stings but at the same time am afraid of bees so I cannot see myself going to my local beekeeper…
    Thanks a lot.
    I wish your wife the best.

    Reply

    • Hi,

      I’m glad that you found the post useful – this has been one of the most visited pages on the blog and I guess that reflects the lack of help or useful information about BVT out there.

      As a beekeeper I have access to bees and my wife was willing to be stung but there would be serious liability issues if I were to sting someone else and they then suffered from an adverse reaction, even if they had signed a disclaimer before hand and this makes it difficult. I am sure that there are many local beekeepers who would supply you with bees to sting yourself but less who would do it for you due to the risk.

      Sadly I do not know of any clinics offering bee venom therapy, either with direct stings or use of needles dipped in bee venom. It may be worth contacting your local beekeepers association to see if anyone there can offer advice.
      Kind regards

      Daniel

      Reply

      • Posted by montse on June 12, 2014 at 2:58 pm

        Thanks for your response Daniel. Very useful, indeed.
        I contacted with a couple of beekeepers associations but with no positive results.
        I know it works because I’ve already received BVT in other country, I also know am not allergic so I´ll persist and if I find someone or somewhere offering this therapy in the UK I´ll post a message. It may help others.
        Thanks again for this useful information.
        Kind regards

  14. Posted by Leslie Butler on June 15, 2014 at 10:43 pm

    I was diagnosed with RA in 2006. I have been on all sorts of medications with my last one leaving me with a horrible infection . I told myself I was done with all the meds after that. I learned of the BVT and did a lot of research and was bound to get this done . I received my test sting two weeks ago and did well an got another sting directly after at the same visit . The next morning I was unable to walk and this lasted for a couple of days . I also had terrible pain and swelling more than usual. It took a week to be myself . It’s been two weeks and I still have a red mark from just the test sting . I’m so sad about it because I wanted this to work . My husband doesn’t think it’s a good idea to return even tho this is what I think I should do .

    Reply

  15. Posted by natural alternative cancer on June 25, 2014 at 10:42 pm

    natural alternative medicine
    Dear Friends
    they offer them a new natural medicine used by the natives of the Amazon for thousands of years ago to cure cancer
    contact: perubiotech@gmail.com
    facebook: https://www.facebook.com/medicine.kambo
    Kambô medicine has been used by many tribes in the Amazon basin for thousands of years. In 1930′s it was first discovered by westerners. Since then there has been research being conducted on the use of this medicine. Hundreds of active bio peptides (small chains of protein-forming amino acids) are present in the Phyllomedusa bicolor and there are also various kinds of Phyllomedusas – depending on the origin.
    This has led to many issues of bio-piracy and quick desires of pharmaceutical companies to make money and do their research. Because of its nearly “miraculous” curing potential a lot of the information about this research isn’t public. The venom of this frog (and others in its category) have been found to help with:
    Cancer, aids, depression, Alzheimer’s, sleeping disturbances, digestive issues, allergies, Parkinson’s, heart conditions, infertility in women, and many more.
    It is also a very potent antibiotic (dermaseptins) and a pain killer with the 40 times stronger than morphine – dermorphins compounds.

    Reply

    • I agree with this post, I’ve been trained as a Kambo practitioner (by a Shipibo peruvian shaman) and have been self-administering Kambo so far I’ve done 3 dots on myself, but many dots on others, the three dots made me purge pretty heavily, but the next day my pain seemed to fade around 60% so far it’s been about 2 weeks and my pain level has gone down a bit more maybe 70% reduction over 2 weeks, also if you have any body odor issues before Kambo those should be mostly gone afterwards, it may even cure acne, and a slew of other issues, but for me the pain relief is greatly appreciated, it allows me to smoke less Medical Cannabis to get out of pain, 1/2 bowl versus 1-2 bowls. (I’m a computer professional and not some pothead FYI, because that’s what I used to think about when someone made a claim like this before trying Medical Cannabis. Not everyone abuses medications, some people are just trying to get out of pain.)

      Reply

  16. Posted by Jeff on August 25, 2014 at 6:00 am

    This is anecdotal, but I’d like to pass on what happened to me recently. I am 62, a former amateur bicycle racer, and still try to remain very fit. Over the past few years I have suffered from chronic joint pain. The last two years I have had hip pain that has flared up periodically and put me off the bike. The last year the situation has gotten much worse, with muscle pain and wrist, neck, back, shoulder and knee joint pain, as well as even eye irritation and chronic gastritis. My C-reactive protein test was normal, but my doctor feels I have a mild auto-immune disorder.

    I went for a ride about 3 weeks ago, and my legs felt like they would flare up if I pushed hard, as has become usual. Ten minutes into the ride a bee got into my jersey and I was stung several times. Possibly more than one bee, I never did see it, just ripped off the jersey and shook it while riding. I don’t react to stings, so I forgot all about it. 20 kms into my ride I realized I had absolutely no hip pain, no leg muscle pain and no neck pain. I rode extremely hard for 75 kms, pounding up hills and maintaining a much faster speed and effort level than I had been able to for a couple of years. In fact it felt like one of my old training rides. Absolutely painfree! It was like a miracle. The effect lasted the rest of the day, in fact it was mildly noticeable for a couple of days. Back to ‘normal’ now, unfortunately. I am very intrigued by the possibility of bee venom therapy, as nothing else has worked and I have had to turn my activity level way down.

    Reply

    • maybe it was a wasp (yellow jacket , usa). they can sting more than once and do not die as a result. maybe we should be using wasps rather than bees?

      Reply

    • Posted by Ann on December 11, 2014 at 8:00 pm

      Hi Iam Ann in NZ I have arthritis 7 years + & am told due to chemical sensitivity will not receive knee replacement surgery as will reject replacement so to look forward to wheelchair. Iam using bee venom honey internally & as a wrap plus diet changes. Just looked at photos of self on sticks last Xmas & now I am without sticks, planning future and starting new biz. I did a website http://www.thewheelchairintheroom.weebly.com which I might change to .co.nz one day. With venom honey nominal bees die & access to it is easy. Thank you Daniel & Emma you turned my mind to bee venom I am indebted to you.

      Reply

  17. I live in Northampton UK and keep bees. My wife has MS and is keen to try this. I would be keen to get some MS specific advice about sting points and frequency from anyone who knows.
    thanks Rob

    Reply

  18. I read your article and many others ibs BVT. with much interest. As we speak I’m in agony and rely on tablets for pain which I hate taking and which has also given me other issues to contend with.
    I live in kent England and cannot find anyone local who does this treatment. If you have any information at all that may help me please feel free to email me. I wish your wife much success ive read that over time the BVT has been proven to cure RA so I’ll keep my fingers crossed for her!!
    Look forward to your update and good luck Kristin

    Reply

  19. Posted by christianpl@yahoo.com.au on March 29, 2015 at 2:39 am

    Dear Sir, thank you for your wonderful post on bee venom therapy. I have recently been diagnosed with OA of the lumbar spine. I discovered bee venom therapy through my frantic online searching for a cure or some real pain relief. I was taking cox-2 inhibitors ans strong pain killers to no avail. It was a lightbulb moment when I realised we have been beekeeping in our yard for sometime. I asked my husband to sting my lumbar spine. With the family watching on I received a series of six stings to my lumbar spine. Kicking and screaming I took my medicine. Guess what! I am pain free. Released from worry and full of hope for remission. And daring to think of a complete cure. I have dietary changes in place. Exercising on a daily basis. Drinking kumbutcha tea. And now thankfully I will add the vinegar and honey drink. Blessing to you and your wife. Yours in kindest thanks, Mrs Christian Pierce.

    Reply

  20. Posted by Nancy Tauer on April 3, 2015 at 2:19 pm

    We raise bees, about 8 years ago I ordered a kit for bee sting therapy to apply to my arm. I did this for several weeks and it had worked. Now at 62 I have RA and the doctors are having a hard time controlling it. I am considering the bee sting therapy after reading your report. You mentioned a “book” that gave instructions, could you please give me the information. Thanks, Nancy Tauer

    Reply

    • Hi Nancy, the booked that I have referred to in a number of my articles on bee venom therapy is Health and the honey bee by Charles Mraz and it’s a very informative guide to actually carrying out the bvt.
      Regards

      Daniel

      Reply

      • Posted by Nancy Tauer on April 16, 2015 at 6:32 pm

        I have a question regarding BVT. I have RA and am currently taking methotrexate, prednisone (which am slowly being taken off for the 3rd time), and other anti- inflammatory drugs. As they decrease the prednisone my hands and legs really flare up, and the doctor was considering a quite expensive drug over the methotrexate which we can’t afford. So, knowing the BVT does work on various things am going to try that.
        My question is: In doing the BVT can I remain on the meds? I don’t want to discuss this with my doctor at this time until I have started the BVT as most doctors do not agree with BVT. I do know you start out slow and gradually increase the stings.
        Please advise.
        Nanc

  21. Hi Nancy, I am not really qualified to answer your question. We have carried out the BVT in my wife as described in the articles that I wrote but I cannot comment on your personal case as I do not know your medical history and I am neither a medical practitioner nor have the drug related knowledge to give you safe advice. I would be very weary of anyone on the internet that you do not know and who says that they can. You do need to be very careful when using bee venom as you can develop an adverse reaction even after many stinging sessions that ran without problems. Sadly you are right that your doctor is unlikely to be pro BVT and will prescribe traditional drug control routes for the RA. These are designed to reduce the joint damage and ease the swelling and pain but will not lead to a recovery. I wish you the very best with your journey through BVT.
    Regards

    Dan

    Reply

  22. Posted by Claudia on September 10, 2015 at 9:58 pm

    I just began BVT in May for MS (Multiple Sclerosis). When I was first diagnosed, I was more than willing to teach myself to take shots, and hopefully slow down the progression of this illness. As time would have it, besides the pain that I had been living with, crazy things began to happen with my body. I had extreme VERTIGO. By extreme, I mean, that I no longer got dizzy from vertigo. Instead, I would just start vomiting uncontrollably, and would always end up in the ER. I had to be given the medication they use on cancer patients to stop the nausea. Shortly after we learned to control this symptom with yet another medication, I developed a new symptom. In the middle of the night, both of my hands woke me up with burning pain, numbness, and tingling all at the same time. Only Pain Patches, placed on both hands, both sides, would stop the pain. And then it began happening in my feet. This happened 4-5 times a week. And That is when I decided that enough was more than enough. Their Medication was no longer slowing anything down. So, I began with BVT in May 2015. I was taught how to do this, and after the very first sting, my hands never woke me again in the middle of the night. They have since stopped burning and so have my feet. My vertigo has gotten somewhat better, but its not all gone. I sting twice a week with about 20-30 bees per session. I would do more, if I could tolerate it. But, lets face it, it hurts a little bit. Given the choice of what I went through and getting stung by a few bees. I will take the bee stings any day of the week. I have more energy than I used to. And that is saying a lot. MS patients struggle with something called MS exhaustion. Probably closely related to Chronic Fatigue, because I could fall asleep at the drop of a hat before I used the Bees. Once I slept for an entire weekend. So, the bees have made a great difference in my life. And if you have issues that truly bother you, with MS or with arthritis, then call an apitherapist. Give them a try. Its not a big deal, it is usually less expensive than the meds, and you feel a lot better in the end. God Bless. Claudia

    Reply

  23. Posted by George on October 12, 2015 at 12:51 pm

    B.v.t could be a cure for h.i.v.?

    Reply

  24. I suggest a combination of BVT and Kambo, do Kambo 3 days in a row, starting at 4-7 dots then increase to 8-10 the second day, and then 12-15 the third day… then wait 3 days and do BVT, the chemicals in Kambo allow other chemicals to penetrate deeper into tissues and even pass the blood brain barrier. Combined you should go into remission.

    Reply

    • Posted by Minni on June 14, 2017 at 12:44 am

      Andrew, what about leeches (hirudotherapy)? How do those compare to either Kambo or apitherapy? I cannot find comparisons anywhere online! For example, which is best for severe varicose veins? Neuropathy? Scoliosis? Osteoarthritis? Painful skin tags? Burning urination? I have all of these conditions. I wish I could find a site which concisely summarizes via a comparison chart, which conditions LEECHES, BEE’S, and KAMBO-FROG’s work best for.

      Reply

  25. Posted by Lorrieanne marler Morris on December 8, 2015 at 3:02 am

    Thank you for all the awesome information you have shared, Dr.suggested BVT for my chronic lyme in Tecate, I can’t seem to find the info for doctor? If you could email me any info it would be so appreciated.

    Lorrieanne Morris

    Reply

  26. Posted by Ismahene bouacid on January 3, 2016 at 9:49 pm

    Hello
    Thanks for sharing your wife’s story … I’m really interested in knowing how she is doing now …
    My mum is diagnosed with reumathoid arthritis and she is doing bee venom therapy now … She was under methotrexate but still feeling pain and swelling joints . now she stopped taking methotrexate while doing BVT
    Please let me know how your wife is doing and any other information that could help
    Thank you very much

    Reply

  27. Posted by ramiz on August 21, 2016 at 7:16 pm

    hi
    any onehad a BVT sesions for burning sensation, sever headache and numbness in the head, please your response is very encouraging as iam getting ready to take my sister to a rehab center and iam dreading the idea of exposing her to all this chemicals. your help is highly appreciated, thank you

    Reply

  28. Posted by Brad Moss on September 9, 2016 at 8:15 pm

    What happened the following years, did your wife get healed ?

    Reply

  29. Posted by Gloria Gonzales on January 13, 2017 at 9:23 pm

    My mother purchased the bee therapy pills because she saw the advertisement on t.v. and she is 70 years old. She feels the same way the older people on the advertisementment feel. They say that after a few days they started to feel better. My mother is desperate to feel better so she ordered the product. The product was 200 dollars and my mother is on a fixed income. This is a lot of money for her to be spending on this product. My mother received the pills and started taking them as the directions state to take the pills. After 5 days of taking the pills she stated that she actually feels worse. That she gets an upset stomach and her body feels worse. Supposingly a director from the company called her to ask her how the product is helping her. She informed him that it actually makes her feel worse. So then he tells her some B’S that it’s because she needs some other type of pills that they have for Only 150 dollars more. My mother explained to him that she does not have more money to be spending and that she has stopped taking the pills that she received because they make her sick. He was upset and hung up. I the daughter called that man back but all I could hear was that he was talking to a female co-worker about going out to a club to go dancing later on. I hung up and called a different number. A female rep answered the phone. I asked for an English speaking rep. She stated that it’s ok. She will work with me. So I explained to her. That the bee therapy pills have not helped my mother but make her feel worse. I told her that I want them to return my mother’s money because their product is not helping my mother. She stated that it takes time and that everybody is different. I stated to her that the product makes my mother sick. She is No longer going to take the product so what are we going to be waiting for. I told her that I am going to call the BBB because their advertisement is false and they Do Not want to return my mother’s money. I told them that we would return the pills once they returned the money. She stated that they are not going to to return her money. I am also going to let people know on their website that this product is false fraudulent and Does Not Work. It is a scam to take money from elderly people.

    Reply

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